National Severe Storms Laboratory App

mPing

University of Oklahoma

Description

The National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) and the Precipitation Identification Near the Ground project (W-PING) have created this app to collect data from volunteers who are interested in watching and reporting on precipitation.

This app and associated web pages are your portal to providing observations to the research meteorologists at NSSL that will help us develop and refine algorithms that use the newly upgraded dual-polarization NEXRAD radars to detect and report on the type of precipitation that you see falling.

The basic idea is simple: NSSL will collect radar data from NEXRAD radars in your area along with sounding data from our models during storm events, and use your data to develop and validate new and better algorithms.

Why? Because the radars cannot see close to the ground at far distances and because automated surface sensors are only at airports. But the people affected by winter weather are everywhere so we need you to tell us what is happening where you are.

All you need to do is use this app to select the precipitation type. Tell NSSL what is hitting the ground. NSSL scientists will compare your report with what the radar has detected and what our models think the atmosphere is doing, and use it to develop new technologies and techniques to determine what kind of precipitation such as snow, ice, rain or hail and its size is falling where.


Screen Shots


National Severe Storms Laboratory App

mPing

University of Oklahoma
iOS iPhone iOS iPhone 4 star rating

Android Android Android 4 star rating

Published

January 29, 2013

Description

The National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) and the Precipitation Identification Near the Ground project (W-PING) have created this app to collect data from volunteers who are interested in watching and reporting on precipitation.

This app and associated web pages are your portal to providing observations to the research meteorologists at NSSL that will help us develop and refine algorithms that use the newly upgraded dual-polarization NEXRAD radars to detect and report on the type of precipitation that you see falling.

The basic idea is simple: NSSL will collect radar data from NEXRAD radars in your area along with sounding data from our models during storm events, and use your data to develop and validate new and better algorithms.

Why? Because the radars cannot see close to the ground at far distances and because automated surface sensors are only at airports. But the people affected by winter weather are everywhere so we need you to tell us what is happening where you are.

All you need to do is use this app to select the precipitation type. Tell NSSL what is hitting the ground. NSSL scientists will compare your report with what the radar has detected and what our models think the atmosphere is doing, and use it to develop new technologies and techniques to determine what kind of precipitation such as snow, ice, rain or hail and its size is falling where.

Screen Shots